London cafe in spiral concrete shell has retractable windows by architecture studio NEX

A spiral cafe with a rooftop garden in Chelsea, London, by architecture studio NEX has curved windows that can retract fully when the weather is good.

 

The windows of the the Cadogan Cafe can retreat into the ground, allowing the dining area to to spill out into the surrounding square.

Wrapped in a slender arcade of 15-centimetre-thick concrete panels, the cafe is located on Duke of York Square, next to the Saatchi Gallery on King's Road.

The retractable, curved glazing elements use a chain system similar to a sash window to lower the windows into a basement channel.

BIG’s New York City school for WeWork encourages interaction and play

Curvaceous wooden reading dens and lily-pad-like cushions for jumping on are among the playful features that architecture firm BIG has included in co-working company WeWork's first school, which has opened in New York City.

 

The WeGrow school opened in the Chelsea neighbourhood on 5 September 2018, in time for the start of the new academic year.

Aimed at ages three to nine, the education centre is the first of its kind run by WeWork – the brand more commonly known for its shared workspaces that have disrupted office culture in cities internationally.

WeGrow by BIG

Peter Marino channels happiness for renovation of Louis Vuitton store in west London

Peter Marino has used artwork by Tracy Emin and the Campana Brothers to animate the interior of Louis Vuitton's New Bond Street store, which has reopened after more than a year of renovation works.

 

Louis Vuitton dominates a corner-block of New Bond Street, a parade of luxury boutiques in west London's affluent Mayfair neighbourhood.

Over the course of 14 months, American architect Peter Marino has overhauled the fashion label's store to feature bright fixtures and furnishings that evoke "happiness with no feeling of intimidation".

"I have worked with Louis Vuitton since 1994, and we have moved away from all the brown wood we used at the beginning," said Marino.

"There has been a real evolution towards something lighter, clearer and dare I say, happier."

The interior of the store is now composed of several expansive, double-height rooms which are each clad in sand-coloured stone tiles.

Each one has been dressed with a selection of artworks, an attempt by Marino to bring the theatrics of the store's window displays inside.

"Volumetrically, we wanted to expand the existing space. We found that people react to impressive volumes by wanting to spend extended periods of time in these spaces," explained Marino.

"[The volumes] are so vast that they really allow for both the art and the fashion designer to be respected within the same space."